Considered by many to be the father of American landscape architecture, Frederick Law Olmsted Sr.’s name is frequently associated with Central Park in Manhattan. However, a largely unknown fact is that Olmstead and his sons’ influence extends to Colorado. “There are entire neighborhoods in Colorado Springs where the residents have no idea such famous architects designed their landscaping and public green spaces,” says Beth Davis, a Broadmoor archivist who unearthed a wealth of information in preparation for the resort’s centennial celebration in 2018.

Spencer Penrose, the founder of The Broadmoor, asked John Charles and Frederick Law Olmsted Jr. to design the property’s grounds to be as artistic and memorable as the resort. Davis has records of the original planting lists (which topped 800 plants in the front garden alone) and discovered the basic plan designed by the Olmsted brothers is still intact. The Broadmoor gardens and Olmsted brothers will be highlighted throughout the month of August with classes, activities and walking tours as part of anniversary happenings. 

An excursion to southwest Colorado with several other journalists this fall demonstrated the wide variety of experiences groups can access in Durango, Cortez and Mancos.

 

The International Live Events Association Denver Chapter held its May meeting at WhirlyBall in Colorado Springs. WhirlyBall combines lacrosse, hockey, basketball and bumper cars into a game that is both skill and chance. Attendees also enjoyed 12 lanes of bowling, craft beer and cocktails, and a chef-driven menu. 

 

The National Association of Catering & Events Denver Chapter gathered in May at Dry Dock Brewery – South Dock in Aurora. Tasty burgers and Dry Dock beers set the stage for learning about the history of photo booths and how they can be used creatively at events.