• American Homebrewing Association Announces Rising Homebrewing Destinations

     
    POSTED November 11, 2016
     

The American Homebrewing Association has recently announced seven rising homebrewing destinations in the US.

“Craft brewing and homebrewing have long supported one another: a thriving craft beer community nurtures a healthy, growing homebrew culture and vice-versa,” says Gary Glass, director, American Homebrewers Association. “Some cities are legendary for such pro-am symbiosis, while others are gaining well-deserved reputations as up-and-coming homebrew hot spots.”

The list includes: Boise, Idaho; Minneapolis; Nashville, Tenn.; Phoenix; Rochester, N.Y.; Tampa, Fla.; and Windsor, Calif.

AHA created the list by evaluating elements like economic impact, proximity to craft breweries, homebrew clubs and membership, competition entries and more. Homebrewing in the US has an economic impact of $1.225 million, and the popularity of continues to rise. About 78 percent of homebrewers have reported increased passion for the industry compared to three years ago.

“No matter where you live, we encourage everyone to try their hand at homebrewing,” says Glass.

It’s that time of year when groups are readying plans for holiday events, and employers are looking at how to celebrate their teams. In the fall 2022 issue of Colorado Meetings + Events, we looked at the state of holiday gatherings and found that they indeed are on the rebound. Some gatherings are going big after two years of not getting together or generally scaling back, while others are opting for in-office parties, small dinners, or community service projects. 

 

Colorado has 58 mountain peaks exceeding 14,000 feet, known locally as “fourteeners” or “14ers.” This is more than any other state and includes the 14,115-foot Pikes Peak, where standing at the summit in 1893 inspired Katharine Lee Bates to write the poem “America” that today is known as the song “America the Beautiful.”

 

For someone who cringes at simply popping a cork on bubbly, sabering offers an alternative, as long as skillfully hefting a heavy sword is doable. It’s certainly impressive enough to watch, but how does someone add this skill to their repertoire?