The 2015 Great American Outdoor Show—sponsored by the National Rifle Association and taking place Feb. 7–15 at the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex in Harrisburg, Penn.—will debut interactive events and competitions in addition to its 1,000-plus hunting, fishing and outdoor sports exhibitors.

Among the newest features is the Family Fun Zone, a kid-friendly area that will be open every day with camouflage painting, magnetic fishing, barrel racing and more.

“This year’s events are a great opportunity for the entire family to test their outdoor sports skills in a fun environment,” says Jeff Poole, NRA shows & exhibits managing director. “Between the show’s events, seminars, the NRA Foundation Banquet and the NRA Country Concert with Lee Brice and Thompson Square, there’s so much to do at the Great American Outdoor Show.”

Other events taking place include game calling contests and a 3-D Bowhunter Challenge. There will be more than 200 seminars and demonstrations hosted by some of the country’s top experts on hunting, fishing and more.

To purchase tickets to the event, visit greatamericanoutdoorshow.org. 

Daily life has been significantly altered by COVID-19, no matter the industry. Many are working from home, while children stay inside for online schooling. Meetings and events have been hit especially hard, since the essence of the industry is face-to-face interactions. While we continue to self-isolate, plenty of organizations have been offering webinars with insights on how to handle the pandemic—watching webinars is a great way to use that extra time you might have used for your commute to learn something useful.

 

As the spread of the novel coronavirus continues to put immense pressure on the U.S. health care system and the people who keep it running, the American Hotel and Lodging Association is working to connect hotels with health workers who are struggling to find housing.

 

With the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, most people are working from home. Many are social distancing or quarantining with their children, who have transitioned to online classes. Restaurants, bars, coffee shops, offices, stores and so much more have been temporarily shut down in many states, affecting daily life in the most unexpected of ways.