• A new-wave venue approach has guests dining in the unlikeliest of places

     
    FROM THE Spring 2016 ISSUE
     
  • A new-wave venue approach has guests dining in the unlikeliest of places

     
    FROM THE Spring 2016 ISSUE
     

The shipping container trend is hitting the Mile High City with two fun examples in the form of Avanti Food & Beverage and Cart-Driver.

Avanti Food & Beverage, Denver’s first collective eatery and restaurant incubator concept, has a space that offers the most potential for groups and is based in the LoHi neighborhood. There are seven eateries (each one self-contained in a shipping container) located in the former Avanti Print and Graphics building that are anchored by shared seating, two attractive bar areas and a rooftop patio with great views of the city skyline. For groups, imagine attendees having seven restaurants to choose from and plenty of space on two floors and outdoors to mingle.

Cart-Driver is a slightly different concept, and it’s immediately clear you are in and around shipping containers as the entire small complex in Denver’s RiNo arts district is fashioned from them. There isn’t a lot of room to wiggle in the restaurant’s 640-square-foot space other than to order and find a few places to sit, but two connected patios and adjoining courtyard are where the options for groups really happen. Specializing in wood-fired pizzas, fresh oysters, prosecco on tap, seasonal market plates and local brews, the eatery also has a mobile wood-fire pizza wagon that travels around the state.

The 160th anniversary of the Colorado Gold Rush is underway. While settlers originally migrated west in hopes of striking gold, groups and leisure travelers today head to Colorado in fall to strike it rich with adventures. Here are two fun ideas for groups during this golden season.  

FALL COLOR TRAIN, LEADVILLE

 

Follow the Colorado Historic Hot Springs Loop for the best in soaks and world-class skiing

 

BACKGROUND: Twenty years ago, Steve and Jeanne Beckley were putting the final touches on the substantial improvement projects that made it possible to reopen the Glenwood Caverns and Historic Fairy Caves. The cave closed to the public during World War I more than 82 years prior.